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Posted 7/2/2014 11:24am by Reuben DeMaster.

The hot summer weather we are experiencing in July is great for your farm grown vegetables. Plants like tomatoes, peppers, and melons need the sunny hot days in order to grow and ripen. The hotter the weather, the sooner you’ll get these seasonal summer specialties.

This week we have been weeding a lot. Weeding is important because we don’t want other plants crowding our vegetables and taking precious nutrients, water and sun. So a well-weeded row means bigger vegetables and an easier time picking them at harvest.

Willow Haven Farm has a unheated hoop structure with a plastic cover. Every year we plant a different crop in our Hoop House which heats up earlier in the season than the outside air and soil. This year our cucumbers are doing very well in the hoop house and, as a result, you are receiving cucumbers a little earlier this year than normal. Our outside cucumbers won’t be ready for several more weeks.

Some of you have been sharing information about our CSA with friends and neighbors. Thank you very much. New members can join by signing up  on our website, www.willowhavenfarmpa.com.

This week your box contains: cabbage, snap peas, lettuce, cucumbers, basil, chives, swiss chard, and arugula.

Here are some ideas to help you use and prepare this week’s vegetables:

Cabbage is great for coleslaw or cooked with pork or sausage and potatoes.

Snap peas are good cooked or raw. Just pull off the stem and side string.

Swiss chard is eaten raw or cooked.  Separate the stems from the leaves and cook the stems for a longer time so they are tender and lose their slightly bitter property. We also like it stir-fried with garlic, soy sauce and sesame oil.

Arugula is a green with a unique nutty, spicy taste. Some like it in a salad or sandwich. If the taste is too strong for you, try chopping it up into pasta salad with lots of other vegetable.

Herbs like basil and chives are great for adding flavor to salads and many recipes. Chop them up finely and then sprinkle them on. This week try them in a coleslaw, pasta salad, or cucumber salad.

Thanks again for joining Willow Haven Farm CSA. We are having a great year!

Posted 6/18/2014 10:52am by Reuben DeMaster.

Welcome to Willow Haven Farm’s CSA

This week, we are finishing up the main plantings of winter squash, cucumbers, cabbage, and collard greens. Once the winter squash is planted, the spring planting season is over and I can breathe a sigh of relief. Now our task is to make sure we keep things watered and weeded and picked at the proper times. The summer vegetables love this hot weather and I’m seeing a lot of strong growth in the fields.

The vegetables you receive are usually washed or at least rinsed. However, we expect that you will need to do another washing before you eat most things. Getting your food from the farm usually includes a little dirt and, occasionally, you can also expect to find an insect in or on your vegetables – especially in the greens. As organic growers, we do not spray for insects and they are part of our ecosystem. Insects are organic and they like vegetables too. None of the insects you see will do any harm; just wash them off.

This week a full share box contains: Bok choi, rhubarb, snap peas, lettuce, garlic scapes and mizuna, kale, radish and swiss chard. 

Here are some ideas to help you use and prepare this week’s vegetables:

  • Bok Choi can be used raw in salads or cole slaw. It can also be steamed, roasted, or stir fried lightly. We love to use olive oil, garlic and salt to season them. You can separate the white stalk from the green bok choi leaf and cook the leaf for a shorter time because it cooks quickly.
  • Rhubarb is a tart stalk that is usually cut up and sweetened to be used in desserts. Classic ideas are rhubarb pie and rhubarb crisp. It can also be sautéed and mixed with a rice pilaf for a savory dish. You can also try adding it to muffins or coffee cakes.Snap peas are delicious raw and you can eat the whole pod, just take off the hard stem. Also stir-fry or lightly sautee or steam them.
  • Garlic scapes are the stem that grows up from the plant while the garlic bulb you are familiar with is forming underground. These have a pleasant garlic taste which you can use raw or cooked. Stir fry with other vegetables or sautee with onions to add to egg omelets or soups.
  • Mizuna is a tender leafy, green that is used like lettuce in salads.   You can eat it by itself or mix it with your lettuce or bok choi or Chinese cabbage leaves.Swiss Chard has a brightly colored stem and a tender leaf. Separate the stems from the leaves and cook the leaf for a shorter time because it cooks quickly. The stem may have a bitter taste unless it is cooked until tender. Some use the leaf raw but I prefer to cook it.
  • Kale is a superfood with lots of minerals, vitamins and phytonutrients. It is usually lightly cooked until bright green while the thick stems can be discarded. Our favorites are Sausage Kale Soup and Stir-fried with garlic, soy sauce and sesame oil.
  • Radishes are a common vegetable used raw in salads. Other ways to use it are to grate it into other dishes, cook it in soups, or even slice and stir-fry. When radish is cooked the spicy quality is reduced.

Thanks again for joining Willow Haven Farm CSA. We are looking forward to a great year!

 

 

 

Posted 6/13/2014 6:25am by Reuben DeMaster.

Hello and welcome to Willow Haven Farm's CSA! We are glad you took the opportunity to connect with our farm for the next five months.  You will be partners with us as we work hard to plant, weed, and harvest Certified Naturally Grown, seasonal produce using organic methods. 

CSA stands for Community Supported Agriculture.  When you purchase a share you are supporting a local farmer and learning how and where your food is produced.  CSA participants support local food production by sharing both the bounty and the risks inherent in farming.  We will communicate how the growing season is going, both the ups and the downs and we invite you to come to the farm to see what we do.

     Everyone knows we had a long, cold winter and a cool, late spring.  On the farm, that means that planting was late and the vegetables are growing slowly because they need the warmth of the sun.  As a share member you will see that as the summer gets warmer, more vegetables will ripen and your box will have more items in it.  Right now we are harvesting our cool season crops. We realize that some of these vegetables will be new to you.  Every week the variety of your share will change as we try to rotate what we pick and new vegetables ripen.  Next week you will have some repeat items and some new ones.  Some items like rhubarb, snap peas and garlic scapes only grow for a couple weeks per year so enjoy them now.

This week's box contains: Chinese cabbage, bok choi, rhubarb, snap peas, lettuce, garlic scapes and mizuna. Here are some ideas to help you use and prepare this weeks vegetables:  Chinese cabbage and Bok Choi can be used raw in salads or cole slaw. They can also be steamed, roasted, or stir fried lightly. We love to use olive oil, garlic and salt to season them. You can separate the white stalk from the green bok choi leaf and cook the leaf for a shorter time because it cooks quickly. Rhubarb is a tart stalk that is usually cut up and sweetened to be used in desserts. Classic ideas are rhubarb pie and rhubarb crisp. It can also be sautéed and mixed with a rice pilaf for a savory dish. You can also try adding it to muffins or coffee cakes. Snap peas are delicious raw and you can eat the whole pod, just take off the hard stem. Also stir-fry or lightly sautee or steam them. Garlic scapes are the stem that grows up from the plant while the garlic bulb you are familiar with is forming underground. These have a pleasant garlic taste which you can use raw or cooked. Stir fry with other vegetables or sautee with onions to add to egg omelets or soups. Mizuna is a tender leafy, green that is used like lettuce in salads.  You can eat it by itself or mix it with your lettuce or bok choi or Chinese cabbage leaves. 

Have a great week.

Reuben

Posted 12/6/2013 11:49am by Reuben DeMaster.

 

THere is another great article by Brian Snyder.  His article correctly distinguishes between two contrasting views of the natural world. Thank you Brian for writing this.

Brian Snyder is the executive director of the Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture (PASA).  Willow Haven Farm has been a proud member of this organization since we started farming.  Brian has been writing a series of articles relating to the ongoing food safety debate in congress.   The proposed rules in this bill will affect many small farms. PASA has been involved in the process of discerning who will be affected.

If you would like to learn more about this issue, Brian's blog is called www.writetofarm.com and he has a gift for explaining these issues in a sensible way.  He also includes some helpful information about the Farm Bill.

Posted 11/18/2013 9:29am by Reuben DeMaster.

Occasionally, people come to the farm and ask if I offer gluten-free bread or pizza options.  I usually offer the suggestion that properly prepared grains may be part of the solution.  All of the bread and pizzas that I make use organic grains made with sourdough methods. 

In the past few years, more and more people have realized that their bodies have trouble digesting wheat or gluten - a protein in wheat.  Some doctors diagnose people with Celiac disease, but it appears that people can have gluten sensitivity even without a fully diagnosed condition.  I have spoken with many people who have found that their health has improved by eliminating some or most wheat products from their diet.  A quick internet search will yield more information on this topic that you can handle.  The opinions on wheat vary widely. 

The Weston A. Price foundation has an interesting perspective on grain consumption that I believe should inform our eating habits.  When Dr. Weston Price did his research of 'primitive' cultures, or people groups eating their traditional diets, he found that grains were normally fermented before consumption.  This means that wheat, barley, rye, corn, and even rice had a particular way of being prepared by the peoples that grew and ate them.  In the case of wheat and rye, the traditional way to eat these products was by soaking the grains and letting them begin to ferment.  We call this process a sourdough.  It means that we allow wild yeast strains and various enzymes to work on the proteins in the grain.  What they didn't know but we do know is that this process makes the nutrients in the grains more available to us and helps us with digestion. 

Eating wheat products without this soaking process appears to be very hard on our digestive system and more people are realizing this every year.  However, eating properly prepared whole grain wheat products has been part of a healthy, traditional diet for thousands of years. 

Some people with gluten sensitivity have discovered that they are able to eat sourdough breads without having the same digestive issues.  In other words, people who cannot easily digest gluten find that they can eat sourdough breads without problems.  I have personally met at least a dozen people who purchase and eat my breads that are not able to eat other wheat products.  Obviously there are different levels of sensitivity and I am not offering medical advice.  However, I want people to be aware of the digestive benefits of eating sourdough bread and that it may even help those with gluten intolerance. 

It appears that the science and research has not been able to explain this situation yet.  However, I have a link to a pilot study that tested 16 people with Celiac disease who had been eating a gluten free diet for 5 years.  The results seem to show that after 60 days, the people eating sourdough products did not have the Celiac symptoms.  Although this study is very small and just a preliminary study, it shows that properly prepared wheat products can be safely consumed by some people with Celiac disease. 

We all should be eating grains that have been prepared properly.  The sourdough process makes nutrients available to our bodies and aids in digestion.  Even people with gluten sensitivity may be able to eat properly prepared wheat products.  You can read more at www.westonaprice.org.   

 

 

 

 

Posted 9/24/2013 1:25pm by Reuben DeMaster.

 

Our 2013 Fishing Story

Our summer fishing trip to Bristol Bay is complete!  This year’s Bristol Bay sockeye salmon run came in just over 22 million fish.   Alaska had above average temperatures this spring, pushing the temperatures in May and June into the 70’s.  By June 10th the Naknek River temperature was 10 degrees above average.  The warm water triggered the salmon run to be a few days early and caught a lot of fisherman still on the beach.  Not our crew, we were on the water and ready to fish when the first salmon started to show up.   During the first two weeks of fishing the weather was beautiful…then the winds blew in.  The winds worked their way up to 50 mile per hour over the course of three days and then back down again.  Not much fun fishing in that kind of weather.  During one of the fishing openings, 3 vessels had windows on their boats blow out by taking big waves over the bow.   Once the blow was over, the temperatures returned to the normal 45 to 55 degree days with a steady wind.   Since the warm water temperatures caused the fish to be early, the salmon run started to slow by the 2nd of July.  This is normally the peak of the season.  Since the number of fish returning to the bay slowed down, the biologist halted the season for 4 days to allow the proper number of fish up the rivers to spawn.  Once the biologist got enough fish up the river they let us fish again.  But by this time there was a low number of fish coming into the district.  With the fishing slow, I started to think about getting home to see Jenn and little Ave Jane!  After a couple more slow days we packed it up and headed for the boat yard with another successful season under our keel. 

 

The Full Story

Wild For Salmon is a local business that makes fresh/frozen wild Alaskan sockeye salmon available to you at a common good price. Because we are the fishermen and we are local, we are able to provide you with the highest quality, flash/frozen, Alaskan sockeye available. Wild For Salmon is owned and operated by Steve and Jenn Kurian of Bloomsburg, PA.

Wild For Salmon began as only an adventurous trip to Alaska in 2002 to do some commercial salmon fishing with a friend. Following our first fishing excursion, we arrived home with 2 coolers of salmon for our friends and family. This is when we quickly realized the uniqueness of the product and the possibilities that lie ahead. We have grown to serve individuals, buying clubs, local farm markets, restaurants, and health food stores. Because Wild For Salmon has increased its sales by an average of over 20% per year over the last 4 years, Steve and Jenn have recently purchased their own boat and commercial fishing permit for Bristol Bay, AK.

Our Boat – The R-J Our Boat – The R-J

June and July are busy months on the boat. The fishing season lasts approximately 5-7 weeks. Steve is the skipper of our 32’ boat, while Jenn, the first mate, and two other local men are deckhands. While on the boat, we listen to the satellite radio to hear the official fishing periods. As we catch the salmon they are kept in refrigerated holds, making sure the quality is preserved. Every 10 hours we offload our fish onto a larger crab boat which takes the fish in for processing. It is quickly filleted, flash frozen, and vacuum sealed to capture the “direct from the boat” flavor. After fishing, the salmon is sent back to PA where we sell the salmon at local farm markets and other venues.

We created this business to provide natural, sustainably harvested salmon products of superior quality, priced for the common good. We offer wild, Alaskan sockeye salmon because we believe the health benefits received from wild salmon are an essential part of our mind and body health.

As the fishermen, we are able to experience the beauty of Alaska and participate in the native culture of the land. As the demand increases for wild salmon and Omega3 rich diets, we are proud to be able to make this product available to you at an affordable cost. Wild For Salmon is delighted to be able to supply you with the best sockeye salmon in the world. Our tireless hours of commercial fishing are rewarded with your love for our product.

Sincerely,

Steve and Jenn

Why Wild?

We do know that fish is important for our health.  However, this is a complex issue.  Logically we’d think farm-raised would be better for our  environment and better for us. (by the way, “ocean-raised” fish is the  same as “farm-raised” just a new marketing name.  Farm-raised fish are  fish in pens in the ocean and when this got a bad wrap they changed the  name, that’s all!) But we have learned that farm raised means that the  fish don’t get lots of swimming room, are prone to disease (and therefore fed antibiotics) and can get out and infect the fish in the wild.  They are also high in mercury.

Where does this come from? is the most important question you  can ask yourself about anything you are consuming.

Let’s look at Farmed Salmon.  Since Farmed Salmon are fed pellets instead of what they eat in the wild, three elements are affected:

  1. First, the food that they normally eat in the wild converts into    powerful omega 3s for us; the farm raised salmon doesn’t have as high    nutritional value.
  2. Second, the food they eat naturally helps them turn that beautiful    pink color to which we are accustomed; the farm raised are therefore    fed  colorings to make them more palatable to our eye.
  3. Finally, the food they eat affects how they taste and there is truly  no comparison in flavor or texture.

When choosing to eat fish, we must consider:

  • The importance of fish to our health with valuable Omega-3s,  protein, low fat.
  • The sustainability of the fish, that it is not overfished and that  it is safe for our environment.
  • The health of the fish and the life of the fish (what it eats, how  it lives).
  • Cost.  We really can’t afford to eat farmed salmon.
  • Taste!

Fish, particularly cold water oily fish, have valuable Omega 3s.  We are just now exploring all the benefits of these EFAs and are finding that they are invaluable to good health.  They help reduce risks of heart disease, cancer, age-related blindness and eye problems, arthritis, and other inflammatory diseases as well as keep a healthy circulatory system.  We should strive for two to three servings (total of 6 – 12 ounces per week as one serving is considered 3 but can be as much as 6 ounces) per week of a fish high in Omega 3s.

We know that wild Salmon has great benefits; however, most grocery stores and restauants that offer “salmon” are offering a genetically engineered (farmed) salmon that is taking over the environment.  Or, we find out, that because of the way the fish is caught, it’s habitats are being damaged and it’s becoming endangered.  We have to carefully look at where the fish is caught and whether or not the fishery is sustainable.  It is important that we make sure our fish is Sustainable and safe for the environment.

It is also important that we make sure THE FISH is healthy and therefore  truly healthful.  Farm-raised fish are raised in small pens in the  ocean secured by nets or in ponds, depending upon the fish species.  As  with most industries, maximizing revenues is key so they will stock a  pond with as many fish as they can leaving very little room for the fish  to move about freely and they are fed pellets of food instead of their  natural food (sounds like the chicken and cattle scenarios all over  again).  This, in turn, doesn’t allow them to use their muscles  naturally nor convert their natural food into powerful Omega 3s for us.   Therefore, farm-raised fish doesn’t have the health benefits of Wild  fish.  Therefore, farm-raised salmon doesn’t have the color of natural  salmon and they are fed colorings to help make the salmon palatable for  our plates.

“Wild salmon become pink by eating sea creatures like krill, which  contain a carotenoid called astaxanthin. Farmed salmon are naturally  grayish but turn pink when they are fed various sources of astaxanthin,  including one that is chemically synthesized and others that originate  from yeast or microalgae.”
– NY Times, Marian Burros
Posted 5/20/2013 12:10pm by Reuben DeMaster.
 
Kris Snyder-Samuelson posted on Willow Haven Farm's timeline

"I just had my first trip of the season to your market. The bread and granola are wonderful, the greens and brocoli are beautiful and the rhubarb jam is such a treat! Thank you for your hard work and dedication to growing and preparing food for us. "

About the pizza:

Lenore MacikonyczRe: the pizza, my husband said he wished I would have brought two of them home! It was great to meet you all today!

Debra Ranck Pizza was yummy

About Reuben's Bread:

 

Jennifer Houser ChristmanI had this bread last year. My favorite snack was it lightly toasted with a little Nutella. Yum!
 
Jan Petery DyszelMy daughter just took her first bite of this bread. "This. Is. Soooo. Good"

 

Posted 5/1/2013 8:54pm by Reuben DeMaster.

The title of this article has been swiped from a blog entry written by Brian Snyder, executive director of the Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture (PASA).  Willow Haven Farm has been a proud member of this organization since we started farming.  Brian has been writing a series of articles relating to the ongoing food safety debate in congress.  If you haven't been paying close attention to this debate, the public comment period for the Food Safety Modernization Act has been extended for another 120 days.  The proposed rules in this bill will affect many small farms. PASA has been involved in the process of discerning who will be affected.

 

Like many things debated in Congress, most of us don't pay close attention.  I believe that we are either too busy or too frustrated to care.  However, if you would like to learn more about this issue, Brian's blog is called www.writetofarm.com and he has a gift for explaining these issues in a sensible way.  He also includes some helpful information about the Farm Bill.  It took me several years to understand that the Farm Bill doesn't primarily support farms or farmers.  Brian writes about this in the article "Agriculture at the Crossroads".  These articles are worth reading and I hope some of you find the time to learn more about the food safety debate.

 

 

Posted 3/25/2013 12:05pm by Reuben DeMaster.

We are featured on the Certified Naturally Grown website at http://www.naturallygrown.org/farms/2209.

Willow Haven Farm has been Certified Naturally Grown for 3 years in order to show that our produce is raised with organic methods.  You can trust the CNG label because it is peer farmer reviewed every year for possible violations

 

Your can read more about CNG on their website.:
Building on Organic Standards   A set of internationally accepted standards and practices for organic agriculture exists, but there's always discussion around the edges of what should officially be considered organic. We took the USDA's Organic standards as a starting point for our produce and livestock programs, to minimize confusion. As a private non-profit organization, we have the freedom to set our own standards, and we've chosen to do so in particular instances. CNG's apiary standards were generated "from scratch" (the NOP doesn't define standards for beekeepers) but in keeping with organic principles. 

Posted 1/25/2013 4:05pm by Reuben DeMaster.

            Thinking about this article reminds me of writing the summer vacation essay on the first day back to school.  I assume that these were assigned to help children make the transition from the rest and joy of summertime to the discipline of learning.  Unlike the child’s essay, I write about vacation with some relief.  I had enough time away from the farm and it is time to return to the life that I have chosen.

            As a farmer, I cannot choose the time of year in which to plan a vacation.  My vacation comes in January.  Not December or February – January.  When I started to plan the family vacation a year ago, my ideas involved somewhere south of here.  Not that I don’t like the cold, but after all it is January.  I have friends and family in Orlando, Ft. Meyers, and Palm Beach Gardens.  But none of those ideas worked out.  No, my January vacation was in Chicago. 

            It happened because my brother-in-law asked Tessa and I to be godparents to his third child.  This was an honor that we wouldn’t refuse so we started thinking about ways to have an enjoyable family vacation in the far west suburbs of Chicago.  Next my family decided that we should get together for Christmas – in Tennessee.  This was a central location and my parents generously reserved a condo through their timeshare membership.  Since we don’t see each other very often, this was included in my vacation plans. 

            The idea of a vacation means different things to different people.  For me, I had to rest my body and my mind by getting away from the farm.  I wanted to spend time with my family and I wanted to see some parts of this great country.  In order to accomplish this ‘vacation’, I had to figure out a way to convince my six children (ages 3-12) that a 2 week trip in our suburban covering 10 states and 3000 miles would be fun.  Actually, that wasn’t nearly as difficult as convincing my wife that we can do this and enjoy it.

            Even though I am writing this in the first person, my ‘I’ always includes Tessa.  She is an amazing person and she had to be in order to make this ‘vacation’ a success.  When our family travels, we attempt to maintain a diet similar to what we are used to eating.  This involves eating at very few restaurants and eating mostly organic and homemade foods.  Needless to say, we spent at least a week getting ready for this vacation.  We both spent the week of Christmas gathering ingredients, planning meals, and making food.  On December 26, I packed 6 gallons of raw milk, 15 dozen eggs, 17 loaves of bread, 7 pounds of cheese, 1 ½ gallons of yogurt, 18 pounds of flour, butter, lard, coconut oil, raisins, almond butter, jam, 2 chickens, 4 pounds of pork sausage, sliced beef, fruit, and 3 quarts of fermented vegetables.  We packed the grains for 14 breakfasts in zip lock bags. 

            On December 27, we loaded the suburban and were off by 6 AM.  Naturally it had snowed the night before and then changed to sleet and rain.  The plow came down our road at 5:30 so we left on schedule.  I find that the first day of travel usually goes well because everyone is excited to finally get going.  My children spend travel time listening to stories on MP3 players.  They have a few books, crafts, and other miscellaneous car activities.  By the time we hit Virginia the roads were dry.  The highlights of the day were buying fireworks in Tennessee and finally teaching the two oldest children what the mile markers on the interstate mean.  We arrived at the condo at 7 PM.  Everyone enjoyed seeing their 7 cousins for a few days. 

            After 4 days in TN, we drove to Chicago.  There we encountered 7 more cousins from Tessa’s side of the family.  The first night in Illinois, the low temperature was 4 degrees.  It was nice to visit for a few days, but our visits meant spending entire days in small homes with between 9 and 16 children.  While some people find this enjoyable, I do not usually find pleasure in this arrangement.  Tessa would say (hopefully) that I am better now than I used to be. 

            Finally after a week on vacation, we had some adventure.  I drove the family to Chicago to visit the Museum of Science and Industry.  It was a great time and we followed it with a trip up the Sears Tower.  None of the children cried on the elevator ride and everyone enjoyed the views from the 103rd floor.  While we were up there, the sun set and the night lights came out.  Eventually we waited in line to step onto the Ledge, an enclosed glass balcony that makes people feel like they are suspended in mid air.  We ended the day with Chicago style pizza on Michigan Avenue.  The next day we returned to Chicago for a tour of three Polish Catholic Churches.  A guide took up to St. Mary of the Angels, St. Hedwig, and St. John Cantius.  She told the history of each parish and helped up to appreciate the architecture and artwork in each place.  The faith and sacrifice of the Polish immigrants inspired us all. 

            The rest of our vacation was spent visiting other friends in Illinois.  On our final day, we went to the Mississippi River Museum in Dubuque, Iowa.  By this point, everyone was tired and ready to head for home.  We had been away from our routine for 2 weeks and the children were annoying each other more than usual.  The food had held out as planned and we only ate 3 meals of restaurant food.  I had located an organic food delivery service called Door-to-Door Organics (unfortunately not a farm) that had resupplied us with vegetables and apples.  I also made another 10 loaves of bread. 

            On the way home, we stopped to visit my sister in Washington, PA.  She had passes to the Pittsburg Zoo so we enjoyed the animals together.  Finally, road weary as we were, we headed for home.  It takes us several days to recover from vacation, but we made it.  At least most of us did.  I left my oldest daughter with my sister for another week before she came home. 

           

           

Farm Made Holiday Cookie Plates Made To OrderDecember 9th, 2017

Dear Friends, The Farm Girl bakes delicious cookies and handpies for our markets all summer long. Now she is offering Holiday Cookie Plates for your parties, exchanges and celebrations. All cookies a

Extra Vegetable and Meat Delivery Available Now!November 27th, 2017

Last week, as I was looking at all the vegetables that are still growing, I realized there may be some who would be interested in one more delivery of fresh, organic vegetables before winter comes. M

Extra Vegetable and Meat Delivery Available Now!November 27th, 2017

Last week, as I was looking at all the vegetables that are still growing, I realized there may be some who would be interested in one more delivery of fresh, organic vegetables before winter comes. M

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